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Art and War - A First Saturday Walking Tour in Downtown Frederick
  • June 5, 2021
  • National Museum of Civil War Medicine
  • 48 E Patrick St, Frederick, 21701
  • 301-695-1864
  • 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
  • $15, Free for Museum Members - Tickets Include Tour and Museum Admission
  • E-MAIL | VISIT WEBSITE | Get Tickets
    Overview

    National Museum of Civil War Medicine Director of Interpretation Jake Wynn will lead a special historic walking tour through Downtown Frederick on June 5, 2021 at 11:00 AM. Jake will be highlighting individual stories from artists who passed through Frederick during the Civil War. The walking tour is limited to 15 participants. Masks are required throughout the tour and we request that you practice strict social distancing. Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

    Mixed in among the soldiers, politicians, and civilians who passed through Frederick, Maryland between 1861 and 1865 were writers, poets, and artists. They helped document what life was like here in this city at the crossroads of war. Discover their story on our final First Saturday walking tour of 2016.

    From the world renowned poem “Barbara Frietchie” by John Greenleaf Whittier to beautiful paintings by celebrated artist Sanford Robinson Gifford and stories by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Frederick was the backdrop for incredibly important events during the American Civil War and the art captured those moments.

    But it wasn’t only the experts who captured these moments. In the newspapers, diaries, and letters of the American Civil War, average soldiers and citizens were also putting pen to paper. Soldier poems, battlefield sketches, and tales from the Army camps of Frederick, Maryland give us different perspectives on the war from new points of view.

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